Sustainable Fabrics 101: Tencel

Sustainable Fabrics 101: Tencel
Oversized blouse + boyfriend jeans- Zara | bag- New Classics | aviators- DKNY (more options) | sandals- Loeffler Randall c/o Shopbop | bracelet- Chloe
Sustainable Fabrics 101: Tencel
Loeffler Randall
Hello, and happy Friday! I'm so glad the weekend is here, even if that just means cleaning, sorting and organizing for this girl... still, there's just something psychologically pleasing about a Friday, you know? I guess they don't call it 'Fri-yay' for nothing. Anyway, there's a couple things I wanted to touch on in this post, starting with a few of my outfit details and then getting into the true matter at hand — fabric. First, let's talk style. I picked up this blouse from Zara recently, and although I'm trying to avoid that store as much as possible, something about this piece really spoke to me — probably its frumpy, crazy-art-teacher vibe, coupled with the fact that this shade of light green is barely a step up on the excitement-meter from beige — you know, something along those lines. I'm feeling a pull towards sloppier silhouettes these days, but what I really wanted to highlight about this blouse is the fact that it's made of Tencel. 'What's Tecel?' some of you may ask? Good question.
Sustainable Fabrics 101: Tencel
Sustainable accessories
Tencel, or Lyocell, is a natural, man-made fiber created from the cellulose found in wood pulp that can be spun into fabric with minimal environmental impact, including water and energy use. It's known for its luxurious look and flattering drape, while being super light, breathable and comfortable to wear. Most Tencel fabrics are machine-washable and wrinkle-resistant, and generally are quite colour-rich as their fibers have high absorbency to dyes. Oh, and they're also biodegradable. #TheMoreYouKnow
Loeffler Randall
In other news, these sandals were a recent Shopbop score — they're by Loeffler Randall, who employ craftspeople in Brazil to create their gorgeous line of footwear. I'm all heart eyes every time I look at their shoes, and because I'm trying to be mindful of where my clothing and accessories are made, I feel good about supporting them. My foldover bag is another sustainable accessory, mindfully-made by SMK in South Korea (and stocked by my favourite sustainable retailer, New Classics). Making the switch to responsibly-made fashion is a long process, but it's one that I'm committed to and really excited about... there are just so many amazing brands out there doing it right (here are six to get you started) that the future of fashion and it's environmental impact suddenly doesn't seem so bleak. What we choose to spend our money on makes a difference, and there's some comfort in knowing that we as consumers can incite change — let's do this! (Zara blouse purchase notwithstanding). xx
Sustainable Fabrics 101: Tencel
***Editor's note: See below for an amazing comment providing more information about Tencel.

Photos by Ashley Antonio

4 comments

  1. I love that you're looking into the pieces you buy in such detail. So responsible of you <3 I love those sandals!

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  2. Hey Vickie,

    I love that you're utilizing your social platform to bring more attention towards sustainable fashion and lesser-known textiles. I have a degree in textile science and fibre technology and I just wanted to mention/add a couple things to the information on Tencel/Lyocell that you've provided:

    - Tencel and lyocell are actually two names for the same fibre. Tencel is a brand name for some lyocell fibres thus, because of the company that manufactures it, most lyocell fibres are produced under this name. The fibre content of a garment may be labeled as 'Tencel' or 'lyocell,' but Tencel is not created from lyocell.

    - Lyocell is a subcategory of rayon. It is a manufactured fibre derived from cellulosic structures (wood pulp to be exact, lyocell is not the name of the cellulosic structure). The process for creating lyocell is very similar to creating other types of rayon, which involves dissolving pulp into a solvent, filtering out the solution, and spinning it into a fully formed fibre. The big difference with lyocell production, compared to other categories of rayon, is that it uses solvent-spinning technology that does not produce harmful chemical emissions. Compared to other types of rayon, it's also the most durable!

    - Lyocell/Tencel has a tendency to fibrillate, which is a fancy way of describing when individual microfibrils splinter and give the overall fabric a fuzzy, peach-skin appearance. Fibrillation is aggravated with excessive laundering/agitation. Many lyocell fabrics have a finishing treatment to prevent fibrillation, but this can also describe why a Tencel garment may look a little fuzzy after repeated launderings!

    Kudos on the commitment towards sustainable fashion!

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    Replies
    1. Wow, thank you so much for the amazing comment — I really appreciate the time you took to write it, and all the clarification you provided! It can be confusing to navigate the world of textiles, so I really do appreciate your writing in :)

      Hope you have an amazing day, and once again, thank you so much! xx

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  3. Such a great ensemble! The shirt is awesome!

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